Photo
neurosciencestuff:

A Mexican Scientist Just Invented a ‘Telekinesis’ Helmet
A researcher just made a remarkable breakthrough in the area of brain-computer interfaces—creating a rig that allows a user to operate machines with thought alone, almost literally granting a form of ‘telekinesis’ over attached devices.
Brain-computer interfaces are a rapidly expanding area of research and industry. Though the technology to read brainwaves from the head’s surface has been around for decades, scientists and engineers have only recently created numerous systems to read signals directly from the brain and translate them into commands that control computers.
In the future, these technologies could allow people with physical disabilities to control their environment through thought alone—the brain-computer interface effectively grants users a form of telekinesis. With an increasingly digital world, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) could allow future generations to interact with technology telepathically. Many of the early BCI studies were promising, but the technology was difficult to use and mentally exhausting.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

A Mexican Scientist Just Invented a ‘Telekinesis’ Helmet

A researcher just made a remarkable breakthrough in the area of brain-computer interfaces—creating a rig that allows a user to operate machines with thought alone, almost literally granting a form of ‘telekinesis’ over attached devices.

Brain-computer interfaces are a rapidly expanding area of research and industry. Though the technology to read brainwaves from the head’s surface has been around for decades, scientists and engineers have only recently created numerous systems to read signals directly from the brain and translate them into commands that control computers.

In the future, these technologies could allow people with physical disabilities to control their environment through thought alone—the brain-computer interface effectively grants users a form of telekinesis. With an increasingly digital world, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) could allow future generations to interact with technology telepathically. Many of the early BCI studies were promising, but the technology was difficult to use and mentally exhausting.

Read more

Photo
futurescope:

How Nanotechnology Could Reengineer Us
from Keithly:

Nanotechnology is an important new area of research that promises significant advances in electronics, materials, biotechnology, alternative energy sources, and dozens of other applications. The graphic below illustrates, at a personal level, the potential impact on each of us. And where electrical measurement is required, Keithley instrumentation is being used in an expanding list of nanotechnology research and development settings.

[source]

futurescope:

How Nanotechnology Could Reengineer Us

from Keithly:

Nanotechnology is an important new area of research that promises significant advances in electronics, materials, biotechnology, alternative energy sources, and dozens of other applications. The graphic below illustrates, at a personal level, the potential impact on each of us. And where electrical measurement is required, Keithley instrumentation is being used in an expanding list of nanotechnology research and development settings.

[source]

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Photo
visualizingmath:

I don’t mean to “steal” this post from Mathispun, but here’s a quick caption for this cool gif. (Caption made available to you by Wikipedia and my copy and pasting skills).
A pair of parabolas face each other symmetrically: one on top and one on the bottom. Then the top parabola is rolled without slipping along the bottom one, and its successive positions are shown in the animation. Then the path traced by the vertex of the top parabola as it rolls is a roulette shown in red, which happens to be a cissoid of Diocles. In geometry, the cissoid of Diocles is a cubic plane curve notable for the property that it can be used to construct two mean proportionals to a given ratio. In particular, it can be used to double a cube. Doubling the cube (also known as the Delian problem) is one of the three most famous geometric problems unsolvable by compass and straightedge construction. It was known to the Egyptians, Greeks, and Indians. To “double the cube” means to be given a cube of some side length s and volume V = s^3, and to construct the side of a new cube, larger than the first, with volume 2V and therefore side length s * cube root 2. The problem is known to be impossible to solve with only compass and straightedge, because cube root 2 (≈ 1.25992105…) is not a constructible number.
Read more about the cissoid of Diocles.
Read more about Doubling the Cube (the Delian Problem).

visualizingmath:

I don’t mean to “steal” this post from Mathispun, but here’s a quick caption for this cool gif. (Caption made available to you by Wikipedia and my copy and pasting skills).

A pair of parabolas face each other symmetrically: one on top and one on the bottom. Then the top parabola is rolled without slipping along the bottom one, and its successive positions are shown in the animation. Then the path traced by the vertex of the top parabola as it rolls is a roulette shown in red, which happens to be a cissoid of Diocles. In geometry, the cissoid of Diocles is a cubic plane curve notable for the property that it can be used to construct two mean proportionals to a given ratio. In particular, it can be used to double a cube. Doubling the cube (also known as the Delian problem) is one of the three most famous geometric problems unsolvable by compass and straightedge construction. It was known to the Egyptians, Greeks, and Indians. To “double the cube” means to be given a cube of some side length s and volume V = s^3, and to construct the side of a new cube, larger than the first, with volume 2V and therefore side length s * cube root 2. The problem is known to be impossible to solve with only compass and straightedge, because cube root 2 (≈ 1.25992105…) is not a constructible number.

Read more about the cissoid of Diocles.

Read more about Doubling the Cube (the Delian Problem).

(via starsaremymuse)

Photoset

I lit up like a Christmas tree, Hazel Grace. The lining of my chest, my left hip, my liver, everywhere.”

(Source: hazellncaster, via eelectric-girl)

Tags: tfios
Photoset

science-junkie:

molecularlifesciences:

Top 5 misconceptions about evolution: A guide to demystify the foundation of modern biology.

Version 2.0

Donate here to support science education:  
National Center for Science Education http://ncse.com

Thank you followers for all your support!
Love, 
molecularlifesciences.tumblr.com

You can find version 1.0 here.

Video

skeptv:

How do Trees Survive Winter?

Humans can go inside or put on clothes, but trees spend winter naked in the cold. Why don’t they all die?

Created by Henry Reich
Animation: Ever Salazar
Production and Writing Team: Alex Reich, Peter Reich, Emily Elert
Music: Nathaniel Schroeder: http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder

via Minute Earth.
podcast - http://podcast.minuteearth.com/
Facebook - http://facebook.com/minuteearth
Twitter - http://twitter.com/MinuteEarth

(via science-junkie)

Photo
-foodporn:

Lasagna For Two
Tags: lasagna food
Photo
scienceyoucanlove:

Particles coming from the universe (cosmic rays) are crossing the earth all the time – they are harmless but invisible to us, also called natural radiation. Cloud chambers are detectors to make the tracks of the particles visible. In its most basic form, a cloud chamber is a sealed environment containing a supersaturated vapor of water or alcohol. When a charged particle (for example, an alpha or beta particle) interacts with the mixture, it ionizes it. The resulting ions act as condensation nuclei, around which a mist will form (because the mixture is on the point of condensation). The high energies of alpha and beta particles mean that a trail is left, due to many ions being produced along the path of the charged particle. These tracks have distinctive shapes (for example, an alpha particle’s track is broad and shows more evidence of deflection by collisions, while an electron’s is thinner and straight). When any uniform magnetic field is applied across the cloud chamber, positively and negatively charged particles will curve in opposite directions, according to the Lorentz force law with two particles of opposite charge.Build one: http://www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl/web/einsteinguide/activities/cloud.htmlor here: http://teachers.web.cern.ch/teachers/document/cloud-final.pdfAn even cheaper/quicker/easier version here:http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/critical-opalescence/2012/10/15/how-to-build-the-worlds-simplest-particle-detector/Professor Brian Cox explains:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWxfliNAI3UVia Wiki
from all science all the time

scienceyoucanlove:

Particles coming from the universe (cosmic rays) are crossing the earth all the time – they are harmless but invisible to us, also called natural radiation. Cloud chambers are detectors to make the tracks of the particles visible. 

In its most basic form, a cloud chamber is a sealed environment containing a supersaturated vapor of water or alcohol. When a charged particle (for example, an alpha or beta particle) interacts with the mixture, it ionizes it. The resulting ions act as condensation nuclei, around which a mist will form (because the mixture is on the point of condensation). The high energies of alpha and beta particles mean that a trail is left, due to many ions being produced along the path of the charged particle. These tracks have distinctive shapes (for example, an alpha particle’s track is broad and shows more evidence of deflection by collisions, while an electron’s is thinner and straight). When any uniform magnetic field is applied across the cloud chamber, positively and negatively charged particles will curve in opposite directions, according to the Lorentz force law with two particles of opposite charge.

Build one: http://www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl/web/einsteinguide/activities/cloud.html

or here: http://teachers.web.cern.ch/teachers/document/cloud-final.pdf

An even cheaper/quicker/easier version here:http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/critical-opalescence/2012/10/15/how-to-build-the-worlds-simplest-particle-detector/

Professor Brian Cox explains:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWxfliNAI3U

Via Wiki

from all science all the time

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Photo
Photo
historiascienciacionales:


La red cósmica del espacio
/ El modelo cosmológico estándar nos cuenta acerca de la formación del universo y predice que las galaxias se encuentras inmersas y conectadas en una red cósmica de materia compuesta, principalmente, de materia oscura, invisible para nosotros, pero que conforma el 84% del universo. Sabemos de la existencia de esta red por los resultados de simulaciones computaciones y, gracias a ellas, conocemos la distribución de materia oscura a grandes escalas, incluyendo los halos de energía oscura en donde las galaxias se forman y los filamentos de la red cósmica que las conectan. Se sabe que la materia ordinaria (toda la materia observable y que representa 4% de todo el universo), debido a la gravedad, sigue la distribución de la materia oscura. Es decir, si se llegara a observar gas ionizado en el espacio, se esperaría que este marcara un patrón similar al que se observa en las simulaciones computacionales.
Imaginemos que estamos en alguna fiesta o concierto con muchas luces láser. En estos eventos, todo el humo del tabaco o gases del vapor se hacen visibles gracias a las luces que los iluminan (algo similar a esta imagen). Ahora, sustituyamos las luces que iluminan los gases por un cuásar (un núcleo activo de una galaxia y uno de los objetos más brillantes del universo) y los gases por una nebulosa de gas de hidrógeno que se extiende a través de 2 millones de años luz de espacio intergaláctico, nada menos que el doble de tamaño de la nebulosa más grande jamás detectada. Así fue como los investigadores de la Universidad de California descubrieron, por primera vez, parte de la red de filamentos de esta red cósmica.
Las observaciones del descubrimiento se lograron usando el Telescopio Keck en Hawái. “Este es un objeto muy excepcional: es gigantesco”, comentó Sebastiano Cantalupo, autor del estudio.
Anteriormente, ya se había detectado gas intergaláctico de esta forma gracias a que absorbe luz de fuentes brillantes en el fondo. El gas de hidrógeno, iluminado por el cuásar, emite una luz ultravioleta que se conoce como radiación Lyman-Alfa. La distancia que hay de la Tierra a este cuásar es inmensa (10 mil millones de años luz), por lo que la luz que se emite se “estira” por la expansión del universo, y de ser una luz ultravioleta invisible pasa a ser una sombra violeta visible para cuando llega al telescopio. Sabiendo esto, los investigadores construyeron un filtro especial para detectar esa longitud de onda y lo instalaron en su espectrofotómetro.
“Este cuásar está iluminando el gas difuso en escalas que jamás habíamos visto, dándonos la primer imagen de gas extendido entre galaxias. Provee un gran vistazo a la estructura completa de nuestro universo”, comentó Xavier Prochaska, coautor del estudio. “Pensamos que el filamento puede ser más extenso, pero solo vemos la parte que está iluminada por la luz del cuásar”, añadió Cantalupo.
Como conclusión, los investigadores estiman que la cantidad de gas de la nébula es, al menos, diez veces mayor de lo que indican sus simulaciones computacionales, pues creen que puede existir más gas contenido en pequeños grupos dentro de la red cósmica, aunque no lo han podido observar en sus modelos. Además, comentan que esto representa un reto para nuestro entendimiento acerca del gas intergaláctico y brinda todo un nuevo laboratorio para probar y redefinir los modelos existentes.
_______________
[En la imagen, el acercamiento muestra una imagen de alta resolución en donde las partes resaltadas son filamentos de gas brillando debido a la influencia del cuasar (proporcionada por S. Cantalupo). La imagen completa es una simulación computacional Bolshoi a gran escala de materia oscura (realizada por Anatoly Klypin y Joel Primack). Tomada de la nota fuente]
Imagen de la nebulosa
Fuente en University of California, Santa Cruz
Artículo en Nature

historiascienciacionales:

La red cósmica del espacio

/ El modelo cosmológico estándar nos cuenta acerca de la formación del universo y predice que las galaxias se encuentras inmersas y conectadas en una red cósmica de materia compuesta, principalmente, de materia oscura, invisible para nosotros, pero que conforma el 84% del universo. Sabemos de la existencia de esta red por los resultados de simulaciones computaciones y, gracias a ellas, conocemos la distribución de materia oscura a grandes escalas, incluyendo los halos de energía oscura en donde las galaxias se forman y los filamentos de la red cósmica que las conectan. Se sabe que la materia ordinaria (toda la materia observable y que representa 4% de todo el universo), debido a la gravedad, sigue la distribución de la materia oscura. Es decir, si se llegara a observar gas ionizado en el espacio, se esperaría que este marcara un patrón similar al que se observa en las simulaciones computacionales.

Imaginemos que estamos en alguna fiesta o concierto con muchas luces láser. En estos eventos, todo el humo del tabaco o gases del vapor se hacen visibles gracias a las luces que los iluminan (algo similar a esta imagen). Ahora, sustituyamos las luces que iluminan los gases por un cuásar (un núcleo activo de una galaxia y uno de los objetos más brillantes del universo) y los gases por una nebulosa de gas de hidrógeno que se extiende a través de 2 millones de años luz de espacio intergaláctico, nada menos que el doble de tamaño de la nebulosa más grande jamás detectada. Así fue como los investigadores de la Universidad de California descubrieron, por primera vez, parte de la red de filamentos de esta red cósmica.

Las observaciones del descubrimiento se lograron usando el Telescopio Keck en Hawái. “Este es un objeto muy excepcional: es gigantesco”, comentó Sebastiano Cantalupo, autor del estudio.

Anteriormente, ya se había detectado gas intergaláctico de esta forma gracias a que absorbe luz de fuentes brillantes en el fondo. El gas de hidrógeno, iluminado por el cuásar, emite una luz ultravioleta que se conoce como radiación Lyman-Alfa. La distancia que hay de la Tierra a este cuásar es inmensa (10 mil millones de años luz), por lo que la luz que se emite se “estira” por la expansión del universo, y de ser una luz ultravioleta invisible pasa a ser una sombra violeta visible para cuando llega al telescopio. Sabiendo esto, los investigadores construyeron un filtro especial para detectar esa longitud de onda y lo instalaron en su espectrofotómetro.

Este cuásar está iluminando el gas difuso en escalas que jamás habíamos visto, dándonos la primer imagen de gas extendido entre galaxias. Provee un gran vistazo a la estructura completa de nuestro universo”, comentó Xavier Prochaska, coautor del estudio. “Pensamos que el filamento puede ser más extenso, pero solo vemos la parte que está iluminada por la luz del cuásar”, añadió Cantalupo.

Como conclusión, los investigadores estiman que la cantidad de gas de la nébula es, al menos, diez veces mayor de lo que indican sus simulaciones computacionales, pues creen que puede existir más gas contenido en pequeños grupos dentro de la red cósmica, aunque no lo han podido observar en sus modelos. Además, comentan que esto representa un reto para nuestro entendimiento acerca del gas intergaláctico y brinda todo un nuevo laboratorio para probar y redefinir los modelos existentes.

_______________

[En la imagen, el acercamiento muestra una imagen de alta resolución en donde las partes resaltadas son filamentos de gas brillando debido a la influencia del cuasar (proporcionada por S. Cantalupo). La imagen completa es una simulación computacional Bolshoi a gran escala de materia oscura (realizada por Anatoly Klypin y Joel Primack). Tomada de la nota fuente]

Imagen de la nebulosa

Fuente en University of California, Santa Cruz

Artículo en Nature